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Cameras

1960s

Hapo Balda Baldix folding camera

Hapo Balda Baldix folding camera

I took my first shots as a child with my father's German, Hapo folding camera; a rather beautiful construction that I now regret selling at a car boot sale many years later.

My Dad liked photography, including the whole darkroom thing, although that was unfortunately too early for me to take a real interest in. I suppose when I turned up it put paid to these more exotic hobbies, and he was left doing the pools coupons and betting the odd shilling on the horses. I thank him for passing on his interest in photography though: it's stayed with me for the rest of my life.

1970s

Zenit E SLR

Zenit E SLR

For the first of my own cameras, I discovered the allure of the SLR, and the Zenit E in particular, which I bought for myself in the 1970s – at an incredibly cheap price for what it was capable of. You could hammer nails in with one of these: a hefty build quality that matched the style of the Lada car, also Russian. It suited my approach: straightforward, a bit clunky, but capable of taking good photographs.

When I finally got fed up with closing the aperture by hand after focusing, before every shot – not to mention carting around something the weight of a brick – I moved on...

1980s

Pentax ME Super

Pentax ME Super

...to a second-hand Pentax ME Super: far smaller, far lighter, neater and more adaptable. This probably kicked off my love of the more compact, lighter camera designs. It lasted me for years, until the back clip gave out and I was reduced to keeping it lightproof with two strips of masking tape. The tape occasionally came off though, giving the odd, interesting shot flooded with abstract colours. Thus I discovered the appeal of the unexpected, vaguely abstract, photograph.

2004

Nikon D40X

Nikon D40X

The Pentax did me well – and I used it for longer than I should have done really since, when digital photography finally took off, I dithered for a long time (a 'late adopter') to see if DSLRs were going to get serious. They did, and I finally plumped for a Nikon D40X. It was quite a weight compared to the Pentax and I never bonded with it – an essential relationship if you're ever going to really enjoy the whole experience. So I sold it fairly briskly and went back to the comfort of a compact.

2004

Canon Powershot A80

Canon Powershot A80

Wanting a lightweight camera that I'd be happy to take anywhere, I went rather to the exterme and bought a very small, compact Canon Powershot A-something-or-other. It took great pictures, for what it was, and I liked the format, but the tiny, rear screen soon proved too small for my long-sighted eyes. After a few months use I lost this camera – a subconscious act perhaps? – before upgrading.

2009

Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ7

Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ7

Camera model numbers got really silly by this time. This was another compact, but with great picture quality and a zoom that was hard to believe for such a small device. But this screen too, while bigger, eventually became a strain, and impossible to see in bright light, so I passed it on to my daughter, who loved it. So she should – it was one of the best compacts on the market and, for its very reasonable price, reminded me a little of the Zenit in the sense that you could purchase such an amazingly well-made camera for such a small amount of money.

2013

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G5

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G5

It was obviously time to move on to a camera with a viewfinder, so that I could actually see what was going on, and I opted for a Panasonic Lumix DMC-G5. It was probably overpriced for what it was, but I was happy to pay for a very decent, almost-DSLR camera in a small, light body. Once I got to grips with the slightly overwhelming number of functions, and customised these to my liking, I bonded with it and I carried it everywhere.

I realise that Panasonic aren't considered a major player when it comes to the very best in cameras, but they do seem to have the edge when it comes to ramming high quality, and a mass of features, into a small, light package.

2016

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

I was getting a little disappointed with the occasional lack of sharpness of the Panasonic lens on the G5. I was also keen to get a camera that performed better at lower light levels, and ideally with more heft in the zoom department. After a lot of research into the just-released models, and toying with the idea of defecting to Sony, I realised that, although the FZ1000 was now a model two-and-a-half years old, and a fixed-lens camera, it ticked all the boxes.

And it didn’t disappoint. Although it broke my weight restriction – it’s virtually the size and weight of a full DSLR – it was worth it: it’s still just comfortable enough to carry all day on a hike. The Leica lens is a delight, and the 25-400 reach of the zoom adds another element to what I could do with a camera. It’s fast, in every sense, and the viewfinder is scary-sharp. And, more to the point, so are the pictures that it takes.